Glass fibre-reinforced plastic (GRP) has become more and more popular in construction circles in recent years. It is often praised for its great strength, durability, and ease of installation – but what exactly is it, and how can it be used to make improvements to your home? Here is a brief guide to GRP and its uses.

What Is GRP?

GRP, often referred to as just ‘fibreglass’ or ‘composite plastic’, is a plastic that has been reinforced by glass fibres to improve its strength, durability, and elasticity. Plastics can also be reinforced by wood fibres or carbon fibres, but the use of glass fibre lends GRP a fantastic resistance to heat – unlike regular plastic, fibreglass composite plastic does not melt.

This heat resistance and strength mean that GRP is a highly versatile material with a wide range of applications. It is often used to make sporting equipment, such as kayaks and surfboards, transportation parts like helicopter rotor blades and boats, and items relating to construction, including roofing parts and drain covers.

GRP in Construction

Many construction businesses have taken to using GRP in their building works, as it requires little to no maintenance once it has been installed and can endure even extreme weather conditions. Not every construction business has experience in using this material, so when you are seeking to make home renovations, such as adding porch or bay canopies, and want to make the most of fibreglass, then you must conduct thorough research. For example, some firms, like Architectural Fibreglass Mouldings Ltd., a company working across the UK, proudly inform their customers that they use GRP extensively in their construction projects. For more information on Architectural Fibreglass Mouldings Ltd. and how it uses fibreglass for home construction projects, take a look at this website.

The Benefits of Fibreglass

There are a huge number of benefits to using GRP when making improvements to your home. One of these benefits is the strength of GRP: it is thought to be as strong as certain metals when compared by weight, with experts claiming that it is even stronger and more durable than steel.

As well as its immense strength, GRP is lightweight and easily mouldable – no special tools are required to shape it, meaning that it can be cut to form on-site instead of needing to be taken to a special facility. This brings down construction costs for companies, so customers can get more for their money, too.

GRP can burn like wood in certain circumstances, but luckily, it can easily be designed to be fire retardant, meaning that it is well suited to home improvements and meets the safety standards required for building houses.

Good-quality GRP products are produced to withstand even extreme weather conditions, and when compared to felt roofs, GRP roofs are less prone to leaking and more likely to last. The longevity and easy maintenance of GRP means that fibreglass products are less likely to need to be replaced, making it a more sustainable option than other materials.

Overall, GRP’s qualities – strength, durability, ease of use – make it a great choice for home improvements.


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